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Brock Prize Jurors for the 2012 Laureate

 

Dick Allington
Professor of Education at the University of Tennessee
Nominee:  P. David Pearson

Professor Allington was an elementary classroom teacher, reading specialist, and federal programs administrator before becoming a professor and researcher at the University of Tennessee. Dick served as the President of the International Reading Association in 2005-2006 and as President of the National Reading Conference in 1996-1997. He received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the International Reading Association for his study of perceptual processing in young children, was co-recipient of the Albert J. Harris Award from IRA in recognition of his work contributing to the understanding of reading and learning disabilities, a recipient of the William S. Gray Award from IRA for his contributions to the profession and has been named to the Reading Hall of Fame.

 

Dick currently serves on the editorial boards of Reading Research Quarterly, Reading Teacher, Remedial and Special Education, the Journal of Literacy Research, the Elementary School Journal, Language Arts, and the Journal of Disability Policy Studies. He has previously served terms on the editorial boards of the Review of Educational Research and the Journal of Educational Psychology, and as associate editor of the Journal of Literacy Research.

 

He is an author of over 150 research articles and ten books focused on research-based reading instruction. Finally, Dick has been the principal investigator on several federal research projects funded by OERI, NIH, and OSEP.


Bruce Barnett

Bruce G. Barnett
Professor in the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department at the University of Texas at San Antonio
Nominee:  Michael Fullan

Dr. Barnett earned a B.A., Psychology at Arizona State University, M.A. in Psychology at Pepperdine University, and Ph.D., Educational Psychology at University of California at Santa Barbara. Before serving at University of Texas at San Antonio, he has worked at the Far West Laboratory, Indiana University, and the University of Northern Colorado. His professional interests include educational leadership preparation programs, particularly cohort-based learning and school-university partnerships; mentoring and coaching; reflective practice, leadership for school improvement, and realities of beginning principals and assistant principals. His work in these areas appears in a variety of books, book chapters, and journals including Educational Administration Quarterly, Journal of Educational Administration, International Journal of Urban Educational Leadership, Journal of Research on Leadership Education, Journal of School Leadership, Journal of Staff Development, and Leading and Managing.

 

For over a decade, he has become involved in international research and program development, co-authoring books on school improvement; researching mentoring and coaching programs operating around the world; and presenting workshops in Australia, New Zealand, England, Ireland, and Canada. In 2008, Bruce was appointed as the Associate Director of International Affairs for the University Council for Educational Administration. His role is to: (1) increase international cooperation and partnerships, (2) encourage international memberships in UCEA, and (3) develop international research and learning opportunities. One of the current projects being implemented is the International School Leadership Development Network, a collaboration of colleagues around the world examining leadership preparation and development in different cultural contexts.


Jeanne Folley Butler
Private Consultant for Arts and Education
Nominee:  Leon Botstein

Jeanne Butler brings more than 35 years of experience in developing and investing resources within the not-for-profit and private sectors. Since 2003 her consulting practice has focused on philanthropy, education, and the arts. She served as a Special Consultant for Partnerships in the Arts and A+ Schools Program at UNC-Greensboro; as a Senior Research Fellow for the Center for Arts and Culture in Washington, DC; and as a Senior Advisor to Creative Capital in New York. She helped develop a sponsoring partnership for the Foundation with TARGET for Great Schools by Design. She coordinated the planning of a national forum on 21st century Stewardship of Historic Sites; she assisted in the development of the K-12 Architecture & Design Education Network (A+DEN). She also works with the Arts Education Partnership, Grantmakers in the Arts, as well as the Kirkpatrick Foundation on a national conversation on creativity and learning. More recently she was retained to research and locate a museum/university repository for a major private anthropological collection. She established the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts at UNCSA and served as the Executive Director for ten years.

 

She established the A+ Schools Program, which is the largest arts-based school reform effort in recent history, and the only one to have had significant research funding attached to it. Other major programs and conferences initiated during her tenure include: The Assembly of Conservatory Leaders: Preparing Performing Artists for the 21st. Century; Consortia of Liberal Educators of Artists (CLEA); Shakespeare Lives! Program; and Building Creative Economies: A Conference with Handmade in America, NEA and Appalachian Regional Commission.



Glen Henry
Director of Arts in Education at the Oklahoma State Department of Education Office of Standards and Curriculum
Nominee:  Sir Ken Robinson

Glen Henry is the Director of Arts in Education at the Oklahoma State Department of Education. Mr. Henry is a lifelong contributor to arts education as an educator, administrator, community arts supporter and artist. He has been recognized for his support of the arts as a recipient of the Oklahoma Governor’s Arts Award in the areas of arts education and community service to the arts. Mr. Henry has over twenty-seven years of experience as an arts administrator, contributing to the development of high quality arts education programs throughout Oklahoma. He received his BA in Art from the State University of New York at Oswego, and a Master of Fine Arts at Arizona State University. Glen is an alumnus of the Education Leaders Institute sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, and has presented at numerous state, national and international conferences. Mr. Henry currently lives in Yukon, Oklahoma with his wife Angela and their two daughters.


Ted M. Kahn
Cofounder, President and CEO of DesignWorlds for Learning, Inc. and Chief Creative Learning Officer and Coach for DesignWorlds for College & Careers
Nominee:  Herbert Kohl

Ted earned his B.A. (1971) in computer science, his M.A (1973), and Ph.D. (1981) in psychology, all from University of California, Berkeley.

 

Ted was honored in 2003 to be named the first lifetime NMC Fellow of the NMC: New Media Consortium, in recognition of his lifelong contributions to the development and creative use of interactive computing, digital media and the web and telecommunications networks for the advancement of teaching, lifelong learning and creative expression in K-12 and higher education, museums and other informal/recreational learning environments and for corporate and business learning and training.

 

He is known internationally as a pioneer and innovator in action-research projects involving technology and learning in both K-12 schools and higher education, homes, workplaces and museums. His commercial business background at Atari, Picodyne Corporation, and Digital F/X, as well as research experience at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and the Institute for Research on Learning, included development and marketing of numerous award-winning educational multimedia products, hypermedia computer-based training systems, and complete user education strategies and support materials for new kinds of tools for lifelong learning and creativity.

 

Ted and his DesignWorlds team applied this background in creating the key web content and web educational marketing messages for Apple in 2000 to support their launch of iMovie, and this web content remained highlighted on Apple's dv and education web site for over 16 months. He has also been a GLEF Fellow of The George Lucas Educational Foundation. He is coauthor of the best-selling book, Atari Games and Recreations.


Khaula Murtadha
Associate Vice Chancellor for Lifelong Learning; Executive Director of the Community Learning Network; and Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
Nominee:  Gloria Ladson Billings

Khaula holds a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of the District of Columbia; a M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction from Miami University; and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from Miami University.

 

Murtadha has written about curriculum change for city schools, urban school leadership, spirituality, social justice activism and women in leadership. She has received the Education Breakthrough Award, given by the 100 Black Women, Indianapolis Chapter (2010); the Indianapolis Public Schools, Asa Hilliard Award, (2010); the Mme. C.J. Walker Outstanding Woman of the Year Award, the Center for Leadership Development, the Minority Business and Professional Achievers Recognition Award (2008). She has also received the IUPUI Faculty Leadership Award (2007). Randall L. Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence, Faculty Fellow (2004 - Present) and the Smallwood Dialogue for Women in Educational Leadership award from the School of Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (2002).

 

Murtadha created a program that pairs student teachers with urban classrooms in an effort to help IUPUI student teachers learn to adapt their skills to the unique needs of the urban classroom and to provide support to IPS as it tries to revitalize its educational programming. Murtadha has also worked to expand the activities of the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education at IUPUI.

 

From 2001 to 2007 Murtadha served as Executive Associate Dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. In 2008, Murtadha received the Mme C. J. Walker Outstanding Woman of the Year Award for her commitment to IUPUI and the Indianapolis community.


Stacy DeCorsey

Ann Thompson
Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Iowa State University
Nominee:  John Bransford

Dr. Thompson earned a B.A. in Mathematics from Pomona College, M.A. in Education from Stanford University, and Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. At Iowa State University, she has served as Senior Scientist, Center for Technology in Learning and Teaching, Interim Associate Dean, College of Human Sciences, Professor and Chair, Curriculum and Instruction, and is the Founding Director for Center for Technology in Learning and Teaching.

 

Dr. Thompson’s research Interests focus on faculty development in technology integration using technology to expand and enhance teacher education; faculty and teacher mentoring programs, as well as engineering as a tool for teaching mathematics and science.

 

She is the author of seven books and more than 50 journal articles in educational technology and was named one of 10 most influential people in educational technology for 2011 by ISU Tech & Learning. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Thompson has been the Editor of Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education; President of Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education; developer of the Technology Mentoring Program in the College of Human Sciences at Iowa State University; co-author of Foundations of Educational Computing; author of introductory educational computing textbook: Personal Applications in Educational Computing; developer of instructional computing program for undergraduate and graduate students; developer and coordinator for the Electronic Education Exchange, a communication network for Iowa educators focusing on needs of new teachers; as well as creator of an educational television series for elementary school teachers on the metric system.

 


Autumn K. Tooms
President, University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA); Director, The Center for Educational Leadership; Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Nominee:  Timothy Rasinski

Autumn has been recognized nationally for her scholarship and service by various organizations such as The National Association of Elementary School Principals and The University Council for Educational Administration. She recently received the 2011 William J. Davis award for outstanding research in educational administration As a principal and teacher in Phoenix, Arizona, she was also honored for her contributions by The Flynn Foundation and the Phoenix Mayor’s office. She began her career in education as a biology teacher, with a bachelor of science in secondary education from Arizona State University. After earning a Master’s degree in educational administration from Northern Arizona University, Autumn returned to Arizona State University to earn a Doctorate in educational leadership and policy studies in 1996.

 

Autumn is the 50th president elect of the premier research organization in the field of educational leadership, The University Council for Educational Administration. Her research has been published in international and national tier one research journals as well as in journals for practitioners such as Kappan and Educational Leadership. Her books also reflect a thoughtful balance in her focus between those who lead schools and those who study school leadership. Autumn’s research has centered on the politics of school leadership and school reform with an area of emphasis on the principalship. Her international work has centered on building university collaboratives to prepare leaders in The Bahamas and the study of how globalization and economic policies affect the day to day leadership decisions of principals in both the United Kingdom and in the United States. Autumn’s primary area of interest is centered on building bridges between schools, those who lead schools, and those who prepare aspiring leaders. This core belief in improving schools through bridge leadership is what drives her commitment to serving The Center for Educational Leadership, the University of Tennessee community, and educational delivery systems throughout the state of Tennessee.



 

Professor of Education at the University of Tennessee